PDA

View Full Version : DOMS



musclema
05-31-2006, 12:33 AM
OK, is this true or not. If I don't have some kind of doms after my workouts does that mean I didn't workout hard enough for growth?? (24 hrs after)

Kristy
05-31-2006, 12:38 AM
Soreness is not an indicator of growth.

Erik
05-31-2006, 01:02 AM
Originally posted by Kristy@May 30 2006, 08:38 PM
Soreness is not an indicator of growth.
Nor an effective workout.

Carrie
05-31-2006, 01:22 AM
Originally posted by Kristy@May 30 2006, 07:38 PM
Soreness is not an indicator of growth.
Hmmm...what does it mean then. I normally get extremely sore after quad workouts. I'm usually sore for 2 or 3 days after the fact...not just sore, but painfully sore. It doesn't really happen with any other body part.
I must be doing something wrong :huh:

Erik
05-31-2006, 01:27 AM
Originally posted by Carrie@May 30 2006, 09:22 PM
Hmmm...what does it mean then. I normally get extremely sore after quad workouts. I'm usually sore for 2 or 3 days after the fact...not just sore, but painfully sore. It doesn't really happen with any other body part.
I must be doing something wrong :huh:
Some muscles get sore; some don't.

Carrie
05-31-2006, 01:31 AM
Is it wiser to rest my quads until the soreness subsides or is ok to do SS cardio (treadmill, jogging) through the pain?

freckles
05-31-2006, 01:39 AM
Work 'em... it will ease the pain - trust me :train:

musclema
05-31-2006, 02:35 AM
OK so I guess doms really doesn't matter and jitters don't mean anything. Got it.

funnyesq
05-31-2006, 04:18 AM
Originally posted by Thunder+May 30 2006, 08:27 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Thunder @ May 30 2006, 08:27 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Carrie@May 30 2006, 09:22 PM
Hmmm...what does it mean then. I normally get extremely sore after quad workouts. I&#39;m usually sore for 2 or 3 days after the fact...not just sore, but painfully sore. It doesn&#39;t really happen with any other body part.
I must be doing something wrong :huh:
Some muscles get sore; some don&#39;t. [/b][/quote]
I&#39;ve wondered about this too. I mean if "soreness" is a sign of "microtears" which are then repairing and making the muscle stronger (maybe I have this wrong and that&#39;s NOT what soreness is?), wouldn&#39;t the goal of a good/effective workout be soreness about 24-36 hours later? I usually feel deprived if I&#39;m not sore later feeling...gee maybe I didn&#39;t work hard enough or really push myself or lifted heavy enough. The other thing is if "soreness" is as I described above, is it possible that the muscle with time getting worked from week to week "adapts" to the workouts and because it is "stronger" it takes more to get it to micro tear and hence be "sore?" Thus perhaps it IS a sign that we didn&#39;t continue pushing ourselves for that effective workout??? And if it is NOT a sign of an effective workout what is?

PowerManDL
05-31-2006, 05:31 AM
Originally posted by funnyesq@May 31 2006, 12:18 AM
I&#39;ve wondered about this too. I mean if "soreness" is a sign of "microtears" which are then repairing and making the muscle stronger (maybe I have this wrong and that&#39;s NOT what soreness is?), wouldn&#39;t the goal of a good/effective workout be soreness about 24-36 hours later? I usually feel deprived if I&#39;m not sore later feeling...gee maybe I didn&#39;t work hard enough or really push myself or lifted heavy enough. The other thing is if "soreness" is as I described above, is it possible that the muscle with time getting worked from week to week "adapts" to the workouts and because it is "stronger" it takes more to get it to micro tear and hence be "sore?" Thus perhaps it IS a sign that we didn&#39;t continue pushing ourselves for that effective workout??? And if it is NOT a sign of an effective workout what is?
Erroneous logic.

Muscle fibers don&#39;t have pain receptors, so you&#39;re not going to "feel" a tear/disruption in a cell membrane.

What you can feel is the inflammation process. Pain comes from inflammation that results due to unfamiliar eccentric stress.

The whole microtrauma and subsequent adaptation is a requirement for muscle growth; however, it has to occur under specific conditions, ie tension-time overload which is still fundamental. In fact, the muscle will adapt to it very quickly if done too much, too often.

Yet another validation for cycling training.