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View Full Version : What is proper BP spotting?



veon
06-04-2006, 01:50 AM
Is it ok to stand behind the bench and watch, and only intervene if it looks like the person is going to be crushed to death?

I need a spotter because I fear for my life when I increase BP weight, but I don't like when a particular floor trainer spots me - he likes to have his hands touching the bar for every rep and it bugs me. Is it rude for me to tell him to back off unless it looks like I'm really struggling?

Kathryn
06-04-2006, 01:52 AM
I do that all the time..it bugs me too when they someone does that.

GqArtguy
06-04-2006, 01:55 AM
I personally ask them what they want before I spot. Some will want the bar unracked for them and others not. If I need spotting, I will tell them exactly what I want them to do.

Beyond that, unless they specify otherwise, I intervene when the bar goes in the opposite direction of where its supposed to. That way they will specifically say "help" or whatever. Cant tell you stupid it is to save someone and have them be like "dude I had that."

Erik
06-04-2006, 02:48 AM
I still do not see the need for a spotter when doing rep work. Maybe for a lift off or something but if you're choosing your weights correctly, why does one need a spot? That means you're either training to failure or doing forced reps, both which I think are overrated.

Cindy Day
06-04-2006, 02:56 AM
If you are going to use a spotter though, for mental boost or whatever, I think it is totally appropriate to set his expectations of how you want to be spotted. That way you don't get assistance you don't want, and yet you have someone there to keep you from eating the bar, unrack, or rack for you.

I usually know what weight to pick for myself that I can get on my own, but when I am trying to go up in weight or having an off day, my arms can give out on me all at once and it's comforting to have them (not just any 'them') there just in case--I'm not looking to do forced reps.

smuggie
06-04-2006, 03:46 AM
I bench in the power rack, so it's not an issue for me.

Leah
06-04-2006, 04:14 AM
I only ask good benchers to spot me, cause I know they know how to spot, lol.

And I like to use a spotter when I am doing a new weight, because I have a tendency not to go up if I don't think I can...and most of the time I can. I don't use a lift off and I tell them how many reps I want and I don't go to failure...if I've told them 5 reps and have to stop at 4, I stop at 4. They are only there to ease my mind and let me do what I can probably do but think I can't.

funnyesq
06-04-2006, 04:29 AM
Originally posted by Thunder@Jun 3 2006, 09:48 PM
I still do not see the need for a spotter when doing rep work. Maybe for a lift off or something but if you're choosing your weights correctly, why does one need a spot? That means you're either training to failure or doing forced reps, both which I think are overrated.
As a newbie, I have a question related to this post.

In chosing a weight, shouldn't we be chosing one that will bring about failure at the last rep? Or at least the last rep of the last set? For me, when I do bench pressing, I usually try for 3 sets. The weight I pick usually is something I can do for most if not all reps during the first set. During the second set, I usually can do what I did in the first set, the third is the challenge I suppose because by then the muscles are fatiguing and that last 1-2 reps are a challenge. As a newbie though I guess I get nervous that I might overestimate my abilities that particular day and would like a spotter as a safety measure in case I can't get to the last rep or so in any set. I want to TRY to get them all in and push myself. Is the push bad? What does it mean "forced reps?" I still try to maintain good form no matter what. Thanks

Erik
06-04-2006, 04:32 AM
In chosing a weight, shouldn't we be chosing one that will bring about failure at the last rep?

Not necessarily no. The pros of training to failure that often do not outweigh the cons.



Or at least the last rep of the last set?

Perhaps there.


For me, when I do bench pressing, I usually try for 3 sets. The weight I pick usually is something I can do for most if not all reps during the first set. During the second set, I usually can do what I did in the first set, the third is the challenge I suppose because by then the muscles are fatiguing and that last 1-2 reps are a challenge.

Sounds normal



As a newbie though I guess I get nervous that I might overestimate my abilities that particular day and would like a spotter as a safety measure in case I can't get to the last rep or so in any set.

I agree. 'Knowing' your limit and when you're not going to get your next rep on your own comes with time. I simply know that I'm going to need help with the next rep, so I rack it.



I want to TRY to get them all in and push myself. Is the push bad? What does it mean "forced reps?" I still try to maintain good form no matter what. Thanks

The push is good. Forced reps are partner assisted reps. They're lifting some of the weight.

sparkygirl
06-04-2006, 05:29 AM
very interesting topic :)

jaleena
06-04-2006, 01:47 PM
I was responding to this last night when I had a minor catastrophe...see what commenting on stuff gets me!
Anyhow, I don't think spotters are necessary for unshirted benchers, at least at the non-elite level. We're dealing with weights we can roll/push down to our hips, and stand up with...I'm much more comfortable with dumping the weight like that than with having a spotter.
That said, I fail very rarely...there was a rough week last month where I failed once on three different lifts during PR attempts, but that's not normal for me at all. I think failing drains the body lots more than necessary, and there isn't much benefit...particulalry psychologically, as failing in training is training to fail, and I need all the help I can get there. I'll stop when I think the next rep/next 5lbs is iffy...if I don't have confidence in the lift, I won't attempt it.

Inatic
06-04-2006, 03:43 PM
Interesting thread. :)

I know im more mentally confident knowing my partner ( :hi: Liteweight ) is standing behind the Bp rack . The bar scares me more than the same wt in db's, which i seem to handle better. :oops:

jaleena
06-04-2006, 10:27 PM
Really? I'm afraid of screwing up my shoulders with heavy db's, because there's such an increased possible ROM...too easy to let it drift a little, and then big oops. I'll only use them for medium and light work, never heavy.