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LexyJoie
05-11-2006, 06:48 PM
As a rule, should one always increase weight for an exercise the week after one can complete all sets and reps assigned? That is, if in my last session (or two) I finished 3 x 10 Incline DB Presses with 25lb DBs, even if the last few reps were a struggle, should I increase to 30lb DBs?

I have this situation with a lot of my lifts, where I can complete my set x rep scheme, but with difficulty and am trying to figure out if I should up all these weights and definitely not be able to complete all sets/reps or if I should wait until I can finish all sets/reps with the same weight with greater ease.

Sorry for the verbosity...

And TIA.

Erik
05-11-2006, 06:53 PM
As a rule, should one always increase weight for an exercise the week after one can complete all sets and reps assigned? That is, if in my last session (or two) I finished 3 x 10 Incline DB Presses with 25lb DBs, even if the last few reps were a struggle, should I increase to 30lb DBs?

Yep.

And if you can only use the 30s for one set, that's fine. Then just drop back down to the 25s for the remainder of your sets. That's still progress. Your next goal would be to use the 30s for two sets, and so on.

jrb1980
05-11-2006, 07:03 PM
Originally posted by LexyJoie@May 11 2006, 06:48 PM
As a rule, should one always increase weight for an exercise the week after one can complete all sets and reps assigned? That is, if in my last session (or two) I finished 3 x 10 Incline DB Presses with 25lb DBs, even if the last few reps were a struggle, should I increase to 30lb DBs?

I have this situation with a lot of my lifts, where I can complete my set x rep scheme, but with difficulty and am trying to figure out if I should up all these weights and definitely not be able to complete all sets/reps or if I should wait until I can finish all sets/reps with the same weight with greater ease.

Sorry for the verbosity...

And TIA.
Crazy. I had the exact same Q. with the same exercise and same weights. :lol:

LexyJoie
05-11-2006, 07:09 PM
Originally posted by jrb1980@May 11 2006, 02:03 PM

Crazy. I had the exact same Q. with the same exercise and same weights. :lol:
That is really strange! Guess we're moving to the 30s! Men at my gym already think it's bizarre that I'm on the 25s :flex:

Thunder - Thanks! Looking forward to tonight's hurt...

Kristen
05-11-2006, 07:23 PM
I'm glad you asked this (gosh, I am saying that a lot lately!). :)

Hoochiemomma
05-11-2006, 07:23 PM
Good to know, good to know. I have not been increasing this way which may be why my progress seems slow.

PowerManDL
05-11-2006, 11:20 PM
You could also build up to a point where those sets are easy before you try to add weight.

But that really just depends on where you are in a training cycle, goal-wise. As a general rule, adding weight is the best idea.

LexyJoie
05-12-2006, 01:09 AM
Done and ouch.

LexyJoie
05-12-2006, 01:09 AM
Wish I had something funny to add in this accidental double post...

jrb1980
05-12-2006, 01:23 AM
Originally posted by PowerManDL@May 11 2006, 11:20 PM
You could also build up to a point where those sets are easy before you try to add weight.

But that really just depends on where you are in a training cycle, goal-wise. As a general rule, adding weight is the best idea.
Can you explain?

PowerManDL
05-12-2006, 01:29 AM
The relative effort of any given set is a way to gauge how "hard" it is.

If you were to take a scale of 1-10 and rate how "hard" your sets were, you'd find that there's a difference in how say a set of 6 with a perceived effort of 10 vs a set of 6 with a perceived effort of 6-7 will impact you.

A 7 might be repeatable, or at least close to it. A 10 wouldn't be.

The idea behind what I said above is that you'd wait until an 8-9 felt like a 6-7 before bumping the weights.

But again, that's a technique I'd reserve for certain situations where the weight increase needs to be deliberately slow, say when the emphasis is on volume of work done.