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Tony
05-21-2006, 04:45 AM
AWESOME stuff.

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/trainingphilosophy.html

Kathryn
05-21-2006, 11:50 AM
Great stuff!!!! Thanks Tony!!! :hi:

Tony
05-21-2006, 04:24 PM
More:

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/bodybuilding.html

jaleena
05-21-2006, 04:39 PM
Woohoo! It says there's nothing wrong with getting my volume from singles!
Erm...what? I can't do 25 singles :blink:

PowerManDL
05-21-2006, 04:43 PM
Approaches to increase workload by minimizing fatigue are solid, but I'm not sure I'd do it with singles just for the time factor involved.

Still, it's a nice thought experiment to show what goes on.

Tony
05-21-2006, 04:44 PM
Originally posted by jaleena@May 21 2006, 11:39 AM
Woohoo! It says there's nothing wrong with getting my volume from singles!
Erm...what? I can't do 25 singles :blink:
One important thing to take from that article is that heavy NON-PUMP type of training will account for 90% of one's muscle gains.

jaleena
05-21-2006, 04:47 PM
Yes, I was just attempting to take that to a further extreme than I already have...but I seriously doubt my body's ability to deal with that.
But thinking of pumps...I've gotten pumps off of triples before. I doubt this is contributing to that extra 10% they're talking about.

PowerManDL
05-21-2006, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Tony+May 21 2006, 12:44 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Tony @ May 21 2006, 12:44 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-jaleena@May 21 2006, 11:39 AM
Woohoo&#33; It says there&#39;s nothing wrong with getting my volume from singles&#33;
Erm...what? I can&#39;t do 25 singles :blink:
One important thing to take from that article is that heavy NON-PUMP type of training will account for 90% of one&#39;s muscle gains. [/b][/quote]
I&#39;m not so sure you can delineate it so simply.

Obviously if you&#39;re talking about volumes of heavy work vs. the high-rep typical fluff you normally see, I agree.

But to just call one pump and one not, when both can cause a pump, doesn&#39;t seem to cover the picture for me.

Of course, at this point I&#39;m not convinced that it&#39;s acute fatigue as much as cumulative workload that gives you the training effect.

But, as per usual, periodize, periodize, periodize.

Tony
05-21-2006, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL+May 21 2006, 11:54 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (PowerManDL @ May 21 2006, 11:54 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Originally posted by Tony@May 21 2006, 12:44 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-jaleena@May 21 2006, 11:39 AM
Woohoo&#33; It says there&#39;s nothing wrong with getting my volume from singles&#33;
Erm...what? I can&#39;t do 25 singles :blink:
One important thing to take from that article is that heavy NON-PUMP type of training will account for 90% of one&#39;s muscle gains.
I&#39;m not so sure you can delineate it so simply.

Obviously if you&#39;re talking about volumes of heavy work vs. the high-rep typical fluff you normally see, I agree.

But to just call one pump and one not, when both can cause a pump, doesn&#39;t seem to cover the picture for me.

Of course, at this point I&#39;m not convinced that it&#39;s acute fatigue as much as cumulative workload that gives you the training effect.

But, as per usual, periodize, periodize, periodize. [/b][/quote]
Yes

PowerManDL
05-21-2006, 05:24 PM
Ya. Increasing the volume of work done with a decently heavy weight is going to be "the" thing for size, especially in naturals.

Tony
05-21-2006, 05:29 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL@May 21 2006, 12:24 PM
Ya. Increasing the volume of work done with a decently heavy weight is going to be "the" thing for size, especially in naturals.
I&#39;ve never been crazy about programs like the 10 sets of 10 where ALL of the work done is with 60%-ish weight. I supposed it would be ok if was done for a short cycle and if one warmed up to sort-of heavy single with 85-90% weight before proceeding to the worksets...

PowerManDL
05-21-2006, 05:30 PM
In the past year or so, I&#39;ve become a big fan of Pavel-type programs, where you use various means to increase the workload with a 5RM or thereabouts.

Ladders, high-frequency cycling, volume build-up, that kind of thing.

In fact, I just started something along those lines today.

quickie
05-21-2006, 06:39 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL@May 21 2006, 05:30 PM
In the past year or so, I&#39;ve become a big fan of Pavel-type programs, where you use various means to increase the workload with a 5RM or thereabouts.

Ladders, high-frequency cycling, volume build-up, that kind of thing.

In fact, I just started something along those lines today.
Can you elaborate on that?

PowerManDL
05-21-2006, 08:48 PM
Check my journal for the specific example I&#39;m using.

Basically you just want to use techniques that minimize fatigue and maximize the amount of work you do with a given weight.

Take ladders for example, where you do one rep, rest, two reps, rest, three reps, rest, and so on.

A 1,2,3 ladder is 6 reps. 1,2,3,4 is 10, 1,2,3,4,5 is 15.

Say you start out with a 5RM load and work up to 3 1,2,3 ladders with it. That&#39;s 18 reps.

Then you spend a cycle or so working it up so you can hit three 1,2,3,4,5 ladders. You&#39;ve now done 45 reps with the same weight.

You&#39;ve improved your ability to work with a weight by using the ladders, which vary the fatigue level between each set, letting you do more work.

Go check out Shaf&#39;s Ladder thread on BodyRecomp. It&#39;ll go into more detail.

PnW
05-22-2006, 02:11 AM
This thread has been really informative :) Thanks for sharing the sites Tony :hi:

quickie
05-22-2006, 02:16 AM
Originally posted by PowerManDL@May 21 2006, 08:48 PM
Check my journal for the specific example I&#39;m using.

Basically you just want to use techniques that minimize fatigue and maximize the amount of work you do with a given weight.

Take ladders for example, where you do one rep, rest, two reps, rest, three reps, rest, and so on.

A 1,2,3 ladder is 6 reps. 1,2,3,4 is 10, 1,2,3,4,5 is 15.

Say you start out with a 5RM load and work up to 3 1,2,3 ladders with it. That&#39;s 18 reps.

Then you spend a cycle or so working it up so you can hit three 1,2,3,4,5 ladders. You&#39;ve now done 45 reps with the same weight.

You&#39;ve improved your ability to work with a weight by using the ladders, which vary the fatigue level between each set, letting you do more work.

Go check out Shaf&#39;s Ladder thread on BodyRecomp. It&#39;ll go into more detail.
Thanks. How long do rest in between reps? You only do this for the heavy compounds?

I&#39;ll check the article.

PowerManDL
05-22-2006, 02:19 AM
Rest as long as it takes. Fours and fives obviously require more than singles and doubles.

Unless you&#39;re after strength endurance, then you just go, rest, go again, and so on.