Food Addiction ...

Discussion in 'Diet, Nutrition and Supplements' started by Erik, Sep 4, 2007.

  1. Inatic

    Inatic Ya Gotta Wanna! Moderator

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    glad your here :hug:
     
  2. sweettart

    sweettart Member

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    It is nice to know I am not alone in these crazy craving's and binge's. :sadface:
     
  3. Mols

    Mols My BFF

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    not at all :wink:
     
  4. chrysalis1

    chrysalis1 No Matter What

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    What I really like here is Erik is dead on with keeping it clear about craving.

    Our(me(20yrs)and the 30%?who are recovering thru the 12 step fellowship) literature clearly states that our (speaking for myself and my fellows) addiction is an "allergy of the body and an obsession of the mind" . We are taught about cravings exactly the way it has been explained here in this thread as in our 1935 literature.

    "once we put [it] in our system we set off the PHENOMENON of craving...." What I really liked was when one postr explained early in the thread what trigger her binge.
    That describes most of mine to a T.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2008
  5. chrysalis1

    chrysalis1 No Matter What

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    I feel totally hungover. What I really want to do is face what is uncomfortable and overcome that . When I tried 12step food groups , I became more crazy with the food focus. I was skinny but miserable as hell
    because there were sooo many rules and rituals that made me feel like a weirdo around other people who didn't have food issues.
     
  6. chrysalis1

    chrysalis1 No Matter What

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    Last edited: Jul 23, 2008
  7. GraceGirl

    GraceGirl His Beautiful Paradox

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    I go through seasons when this addiction doesn't bother me at all, and then BAM! I have a cheat and it spirals into a binge. When it seems everyone around us is eating everything we restrict, it can be overwhelming, especially for those of us who KNOW what to do in order to achieve the body we want.
    It would seem that because of that knowledge, we would follow that path, but then we take the opposite road, desiring to eat simply what everyone else eats.

    There are times when absolute discipline isn't even an issue, and then there are times when adhering seems nearly impossible, like this driving force, a craving, an addiction.

    Ultimate deliverance is my goal.
     
  8. chrysalis1

    chrysalis1 No Matter What

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    Me Too.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. bodyfitgirl

    bodyfitgirl Always working hard

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    I am new to this forum and now I finally get this food addiction! Thanks everyone! Thanks Erik!

    This is all about mind set right? You have to avoid and/or get rid of all the trigger foods from your house! I have way too many trigger foods in my house! It is clean-up time!
     
  10. fitchick1978

    fitchick1978 Member

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    This is really scary... You just described my adolesence... And sadly, sometimes my current reality, though infinitely less, in the last several years. I think having to be accountable to a coach, learning to love the strong body that I have, and learning that food has to be a partner in my quest for balance helped to make things change some. I know that I can't just eat anything that I want, because of my triggers, but I also don't fear the cookies at Christmas now, b/c I'm finally at a point that I have a little control. That said, there are still days when I'm not paticularly busy that I think of little else than when I get to eat again, and how I'm going to cook it... It is a VERY ReAL issie...and unfortunately too many people have it and don't realize it.
     
  11. fitchick1978

    fitchick1978 Member

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    Just want to say that I'm proud of everyone here for being strong enough to do something about it.
     
  12. fitchick1978

    fitchick1978 Member

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    I agree TOTALLY about learning to be around your triggers. Otherwise they rule your world.:chairshot:
     
  13. Jonathan57

    Jonathan57 Active Member

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    This is a great thread, Erik.

    My personal experience is that the food addiction that is just cyclical binging is much more manageable than the addiction that has an underlying cause. Some individuals replace alcohol binging with food binging, which IMHO is a good step-up. If you look at your own weekly training commitment over a period of years, sometimes you can see that the lulls coincide with the binging tendencies, and sometimes with other food habits and seasonal changes.

    I found initially that my binging was seasonal, and "simply" required treating it like a depression - using light therapy and avoiding certain foods, and all forms of milk products (even stonecold :mecry: ) from October thru May. And I began a soy lecithin program. It worked for a long time.

    Until, I started using soy and soy milk hoping for the additional anti-oxidant benefits. That changed things in a negative way. I went for allergy testing and found that I had an allergy to most milk products. And the soy milk / yogurt was causing a similar reaction, although not an allergic one. Sticking with only dry soy solved the problem.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2008
  14. Inatic

    Inatic Ya Gotta Wanna! Moderator

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    Jonathan,

    what is that?
     
  15. Jonathan57

    Jonathan57 Active Member

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    lecithin

    Well, I am no expert, but this is what I experienced/found.

    Soya lecithin program was less to do with exercise, and more to do with survival. As you may already know, Lecithin contains choline and B-vitamins, as well as other components. It was claimed in the 80s' that lecithin could hep improve auto-immune, brain and organ health, reduce depression, and some other things. The two sources of lecithin are soy and eggs (maybe others).

    I went on a lecithin/choline program (not soy) in the 80s when I started having minor heart problems. I had to cut out eggs, and down on milk products. It seemed to fix things. After a few years I reacquired milk and eggs, but eventually developed allergic reactions, but no heart/circulatory problems. So I switched into soy milk products.

    But I found that the soy caused weight gain, reduced the ability to metabolize fat, and slowed metabolism. I also think it slowed my mental processes. When I did some research and found that 60% of soy consumption in North America is from North America soy products, and our land has high aluminum readings, and soy plants readily absorb and pass on aluminum, I decided to cut out soy altogether and try just the basic lecithin supplements. It seems to have worked for me.

    I still have the occasional soy-burger and soy-chili, but no soymilk or yogurt. I still dream of egg yolks. :bannana:
     
  16. Visionquester

    Visionquester Active Member

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    I just recently came to the conclusion that I have a physical addiction to sugar and flour. (aka: bad carbs) It all makes so much sense now really. I have been reading that it's a serotonin thing.

    This really explains why I don't have troubles pre-contest as I am getting my serotonin (aka: the calming chemical) jogging almost every day out in the sun. Even the dog is in a better mood.

    When the contest is over... the weather is just starting to change, the cardio reduces drastically, and the only way to keep my brain functioning properly is to seek pizza and donuts and other addictive carbs. It only works temporarily... ultimately making me feel out of sorts by the lack of control and unplanned weight gain.

    I think that's why they often prescribe anti-depressants for binge eaters. So at least their brain is getting fed what it needs to feel good and making it easier to break the physical habit of bingeing.

    So anyway... I have decided to abstain completely from those triggers. This essentially forces me to develop coping skills necessary to deal with every day life.

    Hopefully this will free up my time to begin to truly live. Live without the preoccupation of when, where, and what my next meal will be.

    I have traced this problem back to age 13 in one form or another and after 20 years I am ready to move on.

    I know abstinence is a drastic solution and definitely not the only solution, but for me, for now... it is working.

    Cheers to recovery,
    ~C.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. kirstny

    kirstny Well-Known Member

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    I have a new client who says she's addicted to food. She needs to lose over 100

    What are some good books to recommend to her?

    I suggested The End of Overeating and Intuitive Eating.

    What are some other good, helpful books?

    Thanks!
     
  18. fluteangel

    fluteangel Well-Known Member

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    I just got "Overcoming Overeating, How to Break the Diet/Binge Cycle and Live a Healthier, More Satisfying Life."

    by Jane Hirschmann and Carol Munter

    Totally jumped off the shelf and tackled me at CVS. Not a bad buy for $7!
     
  19. kirstny

    kirstny Well-Known Member

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    You're finding it helpful?
     
  20. fluteangel

    fluteangel Well-Known Member

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    So far, yes. I haven't read it all the way through yet, but it's definitely giving me a good perspective on things.
     

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