Uphill walking for building muscle?

Discussion in 'Training' started by gymgurl, Nov 14, 2007.

  1. gymgurl

    gymgurl Member

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    How effective do you think uphill walking for cardio would be to help build muscle in the legs?

    I usually uphill walk for my cardio (at about 9-13%, 4.4 mph), but I'm starting to think it may be tiring my legs a little and I might be able to put a little more into my leg lifting sessions if I wasn't doing it.

    Would a leg workout way oversurpass any benefits I'd get from doing uphill walking for cardio (as opposed to say just flat walking)?

    I quit running a little while ago, then replaced with with this (I hate biking and the elliptical), but am not so sure about just doing strictly simply walking for cardio.
     
  2. Patricia

    Patricia Well-Known Member

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    Are you holding on?

    Regardless, I can't see anyone building muscle walking uphill. JMO.

    I also NEVER run for cardio....used to always, now :suicide:
     
  3. Blondell

    Blondell Former Postwhore

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    How often and how much are you doing? If it's affecting your leg training, you may need to bring your volume down a bit.
     
  4. Ana

    Ana Think back...Move forward

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    I'm with Patricia I can't see you putting on muscle from walking uphill. I think you'd be better doing a sensible leg workout
     
  5. Cindy Day

    Cindy Day Well-Known Member

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    Walking won't build sufficient muscle with the exception of possibly absolutely newbie gains. Coming previously from a running background, I don't foresee walking (incline or not) building muscle for you. Leg workouts way surpass any cardio muscle building effects.

    Cardio should not be viewed as a muscle building exercise anyway.

    I don't see the amount of walking your doing as a problem for your leg workouts, but again---that would depend on how much cardio you're doing. How long are your walks? Also, how many and how much volume of leg work outs are you doing would impact how your legs are feeling and recovering.
     
  6. Fitwolf

    Fitwolf Esta mi!

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    Why doesn't the resistance provided by the hill assist in muscle building? I've never understood this - to me it seems similar to using weights or bands.

    Just curious...
     
  7. Erik

    Erik Admin

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    1. How do you continually apply progressive overload?

    2. Walking - aerobic/endurance. Compare it to doing 500 reps of triceps pushdowns. Good for building bigger triceps?
     
  8. Fitwolf

    Fitwolf Esta mi!

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    on a treadmill by increasing the angle... or outside by progressively steeper hikes... or wearing a pack (yeah, but that's really close to weight lifting).

    Hmmm. I sort of understand this. Walking is similar to people in the gym doing high reps with light weight? That makes sense to me - perhaps there are minute gains but nothing of any significance.

    In the summer I hike with varying amounts of weight. I feel like my legs get stronger... but perhaps it is the weight (pack) or perhaps it's just improved endurance.
     
  9. Erik

    Erik Admin

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    To what point? There's a limit is there not?

    More like endless reps with extremely light weight.

    And these endurance-type fibers don't have a lot of growth potential. It's the more powerful, fast twitch fibers that have most of the growth potential, and to stimulate these requires heavy loads. They're powerful, but they fatigue fast. So an endurance activity like walking, isn't going to do anything for these fibers.
     
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  10. Fitwolf

    Fitwolf Esta mi!

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    Yes... at some point I guess you are climbing!

    This makes sense to me. I must experience improved endurance.
     
  11. gymgurl

    gymgurl Member

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    Thanks for all the replies, I'm thinking I'll be cutting it out then.

    Right now I do about 20-25 minutes each day...which is probably overkill anyway.

    If I was just doing plain, flat walking (I do not want to run anymore), would that be enough just for cardiovascular purposes? Then I'll add in 2 good leg workouts a week?

    Oh and I should add, for my leg workouts normally I'm doing:
    4 sets of squats (6-8 reps)
    4 sets of lunges (5 reps)
    4 sets of deadlifts (6-8 reps)

    3 sets of leg extensions/hamstring curls (supersetted)
    3 sets of calf raises

    So that's twice per week, in addition to the uphill walking.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2007
  12. gymgurl

    gymgurl Member

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    ..and just curious, what are you doing then for cardio?
     
  13. Patricia

    Patricia Well-Known Member

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    For my last comp prep I did the stepmill only.

    Now I'll piddle on the treadmill at an incline (no holding of course), stepmill, regualr stair master, and bike on occasion.
     
  14. Patricia

    Patricia Well-Known Member

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    One leg day I'd have at higher reps.
     
  15. Patyal

    Patyal I'm reinventing myself

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    IMHO, this is too much for twice a week isolated leg workouts. You need to remember that you need to let your legs recover to make them grow. Additionally, if you are eating on deficit (to diet) this much training might increase your cortisol levels and lead to over-training. Sometimes less is better ;)
     
  16. Audrey

    Audrey Well-Known Member

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    I also would do the lunges for higher reps than 5 (maybe 10-12 reps).
     
  17. gymgurl

    gymgurl Member

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    Thanks again for the responses.

    Okay, so maybe I should cut back on the volume as well. I am eating at maintenance right now, or so it seems as my weight is stable (~1600 calories a day - and I'm 115).

    With the lunges then, it would be better to reduce the weight? I was just trying to lift heavy...which then means I usually fatigue around 5, sometimes 6.

    So to reduce back, would it be better to reduce the # of exercises, or maybe bring the sets down to 3? I'm assuming I should be keeping leg training in twice per week?

    And another question I had, and hopefully I can explain this right, the shape of my legs, they tend to be quite thick (so to speak, I don't exactly have huge legs, given my size, just speaking in terms of proportion) at the top, with not very much outer quad definition around the knee. So it's kind of like they are thin around the knees and just get wide as it goes up. I don't have a really high body fat, as my abs are visible, but do tend to carry more in my lower body.

    Ideally I'd like to add more size to the outer quad, so that it created more of a curved look, especially around the knee...if that makes sense?

    Are there any exercises that would do this more maybe - or ones to avoid?
     
  18. Patyal

    Patyal I'm reinventing myself

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    Yeah, throw some sets of bulgarian squats :hehe: Make it work!!
     
  19. Patyal

    Patyal I'm reinventing myself

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    I suggest front squats below parallel and hack squats :whipped:
     
  20. gymgurl

    gymgurl Member

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    You're all about the self-torture! :)

    I also do one-legged squats holding a dumbell on one of the days (usually to replace the lunges). These I do go up to about 8-10 reps on.

    I have definitely noticed improvements though since I started squatting below parallel...thank God I made that change!
     

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